Music & Movies

Emeli Sande visit in Zambia/ Lusaka Times
Emeli Sande visit in Zambia/ Lusaka Times
Emeli Sande visit in Zambia/ Photo by Lusaka Times

SCOTTISH recording artiste and songwriter, Emeli Sande, has described her recent visit to Zambia as inspiring and an eye-opener.
Sande, whose father Joel is Zambian, was in the country at the invitation of Oxfam Zambia. She was also accompanied by her mother and sister.
The award-winning soul and R&B recording artist and songwriter’s visit was aimed at raising awareness of the impact of inequality in Zambia, especially violence against women and girls, challenges of women small holder farmers, as well as the need for access to quality health care and quality education for children in community schools.
Speaking at a media briefing at Radisson Blu Hotel last Friday, Sande, 27, said she had had a wonderful time in the country.
“I do feel like this is home, I do feel connected to this country…I’ve really been inspired by the work that Oxfam is doing here and I hope that more people can become aware because it’s really needed.”
A former medical student, Sande said she was greatly impacted by her experiences of speaking with women farmers and the challenges of limited resources in rural health centres in Zambia.
“… I think the health issues are something that really hit home with me and for me it would be a priority of where to start.”
She said a workshop with various local musicians brought out the importance of music as a powerful force for good, and how artistes should take responsibility for their lyrics.
“I have a real fascination with music therapy; so hearing about how the musicians can try and make the music heal a community and try and bring a new message was something I could really connect to,” she said.
She also urged aspiring female artistes to prioritise education.
“I come from the UK (and) I’ve had a lot more opportunities but I do believe education is a very important thing. It gives you a lot of freedom; and so many options. I would never recommend rushing into any media industry. Music is fantastic but have something you feel can give you power and can give you a choice in your life. That’s what I really recommend; going as far as you can in education…”
Sande , known for her hit singles “Next to me”, “Wonder” also addressed the scourge of piracy, and called for support for local artistes.
“It’s difficult because even in the UK, in America, (on) the Internet everyone can get everything for free…there has to be some form of support to what..musicians are doing. Again that’s a hard thing to get into people’s minds. I think live music is one way of really targeting piracy because I think you have to accept at some point that people will take music for free; it’s available. But live music you can’t replicate that; it’s priceless. (So), live music and getting it in people’s heads that the support is genuinely needed for the industry to flourish,” said Sande./POST ZAMBIA

Emeli Sande
Emeli Sande
Emeli Sande
Emeli Sande

EMELI Sande has thanked her Zambian roots for influencing her musical talents.
The Heaven singer, whose mother is English and whose father is Zambian, grew up in the UK, but African culture largely influenced her during her childhood.
She revealed: “At home, Dad always spoke of a relative in Zambia, either his auntie or his grandmother, who used to go into these musical trances. She’d be busy cooking and then suddenly starts singing.

“He’d say I reminded him of her because I’d start singing and that would be it until the end of the night. So I feel that side of me comes from my Zambian ancestry.”
Emeli also admitted that growing up as a mixed race child in a white neighbourhood made her struggle to fit in and cites music as helping her to find her identity.
Here is a write-up from her official website:
“You are a 23-year-old from rural northern Scotland. Piano has been your instrument, your songwriting tool, since you were ten; your voice has been remarkable for even longer. A tattoo of artist Frida Kahlo – a typically single-minded, forthright heroine runs the length of your right forearm.
Some of the greatest names in modern pop have sung your thrustingly exciting compositions: Tinie Tempah (Let Go), Professor Green (Kids That Love To Dance), Tinchy Stryder (Let It Rain), Chipmunk (Diamond Rings), Wiley (Never Be Your Woman). You’ve also written for divas big (Susan Boyle), small (Cheryl Cole) and medium-sized (The Saturdays). Your dad (from Zambia) and your mum (from Cumbria), who schooled you in music and encouraged your ambitions, are already proud.
Then there are the richly melodic, classically powerful, retro-futurist soul-pop songs you’ve written for your own debut album. Your love for – and understanding of – Nina Simone, Joni Mitchell and Lauryn Hill are obvious, loud and proud.
Then there’s the stuff you did in your ‘spare time’: three-quarters of a six-year degree in medicine at Glasgow University. You specialised in Clinical Neuro-Science, “cause I really like all the brain stuff.”
You are Emeli Sande, and you also really like all the soul stuff, all the heart stuff, and all the emotional stuff. Not many people knew it, but you were behind some of the key pop tracks of recent years. Now you’re about to be the voice in front of the freshest debut of 2012.
Since its release in February, ‘Our Version of Events’ has gone on to become UK’s biggest selling debut album of 2012 so far, winning Emeli this year’s coveted BRITs Critics’ Choice Award, securing her a slot on Coldplay’s US tour and at Coca-Cola’s Olympic Torch Relay City Celebrations. – /Zambia Daily Mail/Sbtv/emelisande.com.

Mr. C (Ackim Chansa)

By NDANGWA MWITTAH

 Mr. C (Ackim Chansa)
Mr. C (Ackim Chansa)
AN up and coming Copperbelt based artiste Mr. C (Ackim Chansa) has released a six-track mixtape, whose response from the public he says has been good so far.

A music producer-cum-video editor, Ackim speaks highly of his his mixtape titled ‘Spaka Jazzy’ which he says caters for a diverse range of music fans.

“Spaka Jazzy was produced in Chililabombwe at 100% Music Studios. The mixtape is already taking the airwaves around the Copperbelt by storm. Many of the songs are playing in night clubs and on local radio stations,” he says.
The album, classified as an Afro-pop collection, was produced by two green horn producers, Uncle P and IMK, both of Chililabombwe.

It has songs such as the title-track Spaka Jazzy, Asembe, Panono Panono, Wilalila, Plasma TV that features Hillz as well as Tata, a gospel song in which he is encouraging people to seek God’s guidance in all their endeavours.
“All the songs have got a message in them. They are all songs that make one reflect on some of the things that are happening in our society today,” says the former programmes manager at Blue Sky FM, a community radio station based in Mumbwa.

The burly musician, who is also a miner on the Copperbelt, is currently studying for an MBA online.
“Music is a business just like any other business which requires attention and time. But it has one advantage it can co-exist with education, full time employment and entrepreneurship as long as the artiste avoids certain things associated with it. Things like drug and alcohol abuse as well as sex,” he said.

Ackim has previously worked with the likes of Red Linso, Petersen, Mc Wabwino, Robby Kalijo and Bob Mabege

Source: Daily Mail

Opera singer Chrispin Lindunda playing Por Phiri in the premiere of Damyna, Damyna. The Opera.
Opera singer Chrispin Lindunda playing Por Phiri in the premiere of Damyna, Damyna. The Opera.

Fifty-strong cast showcases local talent

Music-lovers, opera buffs and Zambia’s glitterati turned out in droves for the world premiere of Damyna, Damyna at the Lusaka Playhouse last week (April 3-5).

The cast received a standing ovation from the delighted audience on the final night following the three-day run of the colourful opera, which featured more than 50 classically trained Zambian musicians and singers.

The OperaZ Orchestra, Kanon Choir and Team Jiva dancers showcased some of the country’s best talent in Damyna, Damyna, a story of drama, romance and intrigue that explored the conflicts of modern-day society.

“I loved this opera. I loved it because of the love and effort that went into making it. I loved it because of the ownership of the performers and the obvious delight each of them showed in performing,” said music teacher and opera aficionado Julie Chilton, who watched the show.

Local performers were joined by five guest musicians from the Stuttgart Philharmonic Orchestra and Music Academy in Germany, and were conducted by renowned conductor Theo Bross.

The opera starred soloists Lulu Imbula, Chrispin Lindunda, Paddy Mukando, Cathrin Mukupa, Stanley Musowe, Josephine Kachiza, Mate Mate and Portia Imbula.

Music direction was by Milupi Imbula, choreography by Michael Malambo, production design by Nadezda Chibanda, stage manager was Chris Mulambwa, lighting by Patrick Mwanza, Vernon Munenga.

The Kanon Choir chorus comprised Annie Namiluko, Anniesha Angenda, Belita Mengo, Danani Longwe, Daniel Mwalwambe, Elizabeth Changano, Kennedy Liywali, Lucy Akapelwa, Maimbolwa Akabana, Maria Kachiza, Miyanda Nyambe, Mutafela Mutafela, Nicholas Nkomesha, Ntombizine Chipangula, Richard Mubayaeta, Tom Chiponge, Ulande Nkomesha, Thandiwe Sakala.

The OperaZ orchestra comprised Clark Siachaba (Flute), Isaac Mayungo (Cello), Kebby Moola (Clarinet), Levan Muleya (Violin), Mark Msadala (Violin), Nathan Kabeya (Violin), Numwa Ndopu (Trumpet), Oscar Maambo (Horn), Terence Kamwi (Double Bass), Andrew Olsen (Viola).

Guest musicians were Agnese Eglina (piano), Anne-Alice Aubry (bassoon), Christian Pohl (oboe), Luka Alexander (percussion), Ying Chen Wang (violin).

Team Jiva dancers were Anthony Kasongo, David Kunda, Frank Chris Sinyangwe, Laura Chinkuli, Morris Fenete, Oscar Mubanga, Wana Shachile, Winter Kasikili.

Sponsors included Manzi Valley, Proflight Zambia, ProCharter, Amatheon Agri, , Capital Fisheries, Ngoma Dolce Music Academy and Langmead & Baker.

It was the collective’s first performance of the opera, which explores the conflicts between traditional rural life in Zambia and the attractions and challenges of modern urban living. Essentially a love story, the allegory also examines controversial issues surrounding orphans, donor influence, the gap between rich and poor and the everyday struggles of rural life.

The opera was composed and written by long-term Zambia resident Dr Peter Langmead, who has spent much of his working life travelling throughout Zambia for his work, drawing inspiration for the composition from his experiences and observation.

The story is of a Zambian story of a girl child, Damyna, who is nearly sold to her mother’s moneylender but is then brought up by her mother’s sister, Mrs Bwalya. To avoid difficulties with her half-brother, Por Phiri, his mother ensures he believes she is his real sister, but they love each other dearly.

Trouble arrives in the compound when two attractive consultants (Kati Poult and Given Chansa) arrive to change their farming, one European, one African.

The international brother falls in love with the European girl, the African consultant falls in love with Damyna, with some erroneous help from a drunken witch doctor, who assumes Damyna and Por are really brother and sister.

In the second Act, the witch doctor has to correct his mistake but is nearly foiled by Damyna’s adopted mother’s husband claiming to be the father of both Damyna and Por, and looking like the witch doctor.

Damyna’s adopted mother however says her husband is not actually the father of her son, so Damyna and Por can now marry, while Damyna’s high ranking and uniformed real father at the wedding also looks remarkably like the witch doctor.

Damyna Damyna is about the realities of life familiar to many people, but the show also has magical touches and quite a few surprises.” said Dr Langmead. “It is also an opportunity for people to see the remarkable – and often hidden – talent that we have in Zambia.”

Dr Langmead’s vision is to restore opera’s reputation as an entertainment event for ordinary people, rather than an elitist art form. He aims to encourage and stage new compositions by new composers, and break the mould, rather than dwell on the traditional Western classical pieces.

Instead he hopes to impart his enthusiasm and passion for contemporary classical music to a new generation of young performers and artists who are keen to break down the barriers between old and new, traditional and modern, and classical and contemporary music.

About OperaZ

OperaZ is a collective of talented classically trained Zambian singers and musicians, along with some of the country’s leading contemporary dancers.

The aim is to showcase new contemporary compositions through performances throughout Zambia and internationally.

The group also aims to nurture emerging classical music talent, inspire new musicians to reach their potential and provide a platform to bring work to a wider audience.

For more information visit www.operaz.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/OperaZed

Twitter: @Opera4Z

The Lusaka Playhouse orchestra pit is uncovered for the first time in many years
The Lusaka Playhouse orchestra pit is uncovered for the first time in many years
The Lusaka Playhouse orchestra pit is uncovered for the first time in many years

Orchestra pit given new lease of life

A fascinating piece of theatrical history was uncovered this week with the reopening of the Lusaka Playhouse orchestra pit for the first time in many years.

The nerve-centre of musical performances is believed to have been forgotten, hidden and gathering dust beneath the stage of the city’s theatrical home.

Now the OperaZ contemporary classical music group has given the orchestra pit a new lease of life, opening it up for performances once again with the world premiere of Damyna, Damyna being performed there from April 3-5.

An orchestra pit is the part of the theatre where an orchestra plays, between the front of the stage and the audience, and usually set at a lower level.

The OperaZ Orchestra of some 20 classically trained Zambian musicians playing violins, flutes, clarinet, trumpet, cello, horn, bassoon, trombone and piano, will bring the pit – and the stage – back to its former glory, conducted by Theo Bross, and  accompanying a further 20 members of the Kanon Choir, talented soloists and Team Jiva hip hop dancers.

The opera stars soloists are Lulu Imbula, Chrispin Lindunda, Paddy Mukando, Cathrin Mukupa, Stanley Musowe, Josephine Kachiza, Mate Mate and Portia Imbula.

Music direction is by Milupi Imbula; choreography by Michael Malambo; production design by Nadezda Chibanda; stage manager is Chris Mulambwa.

Sponsors include Manzi Valley, Proflight Zambia, ProCharter, Amatheon Agri, Ngoma Dolce Music Academy and Langmead & Baker.

Rehearsals are at an advanced stage for the collective’s first performance of the opera, which explores the conflicts between traditional rural life in Zambia and the attractions and challenges of modern urban living. Essentially a love story, the allegory also examines controversial issues surrounding orphans, donor influence, the gap between rich and poor and the everyday struggles of rural life.

The opera is composed and written by long-term Zambia resident Dr Peter Langmead, who has spent much of his working life travelling throughout Zambia for his work, drawing inspiration for the composition from his experiences and observation.

Damyna Damyna is about the realities of life familiar to many people, but the show also has magical touches and quite a few surprises.” said Dr Langmead. “It is also an opportunity for people to see the remarkable – and often hidden – talent that we have in Zambia.”

Dr Langmead’s vision is to restore opera’s reputation as an entertainment event for ordinary people, rather than an elitist art form. He aims to encourage and stage new compositions by new composers, and break the mould, rather than dwell on the traditional Western classical pieces.

Instead he hopes to impart his enthusiasm and passion for contemporary classical music to a new generation of young performers and artists who are keen to break down the barriers between old and new, traditional and modern, and classical and contemporary music.

The opera will be staged at the Lusaka Playhouse at 19hrs on Thursday, April 3, Friday, April 4 and Saturday, April 5. Tickets are K200 and can be reserved by calling 0976 750044 or emailing OperaZ@langmead.com

About OperaZ

OperaZ is a collective of talented classically trained Zambian singers and musicians, along with some of the country’s leading contemporary dancers.

The aim is to showcase new contemporary compositions through performances throughout Zambia and internationally.

The group also aims to nurture emerging classical music talent, inspire new musicians to reach their potential and provide a platform to bring work to a wider audience.

For more information visit www.operaz.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/OperaZed

Twitter: @Opera4Z

 

Zone Fam Channel O Awards1Zambian Hip Hop outfit Zone Fam have been Nominated in the World Music Awards Best Group Category. Our appeal to the Fans at large are to Let us help put Zambian Music on the World Map by visiting the following link and Clicking on Zone Fam’s image at the Bottom of the page, followed by your details – i.e Names, email address – lastly agree to the terms and click on ‘Cast Your Vote’

Voting Link:-

http://vote.worldmusicawards.com/selectnomination.asp?cat=6

More Info:-

http://www.worldmusicawards.com/

Album artworkPRETORIA, February 7 2014 — Zambian-born singer-songwriter and author Moonga Mkandawire has released “Lie lie lie” the first single from his written collection of 32 songs which is titled “Where to Now? An anthology of lyrics and the journey that inspired them”.

Written over six years, the lyrics of the songs recount Moonga’s decision to leave the path towards a sure career in finance to pursue his musical talent. “I chose to write about my journey because it’s a road so many people are familiar with. For me songs are first about words – about the message, about the emotion – and then the music comes. It felt right to put the words out there first and really ask the audience to pay attention to the meaning and then enjoy the music,” says Moonga.

And now, audiences can indeed take pleasure in Moonga’s first single, Lie lie lie – a “love story with a twist” that is woven around a great groove. Though he has been living in South Africa for the past 15 years, Moonga credits the Kalindula music of Zambia and American Country music for his inspiration. His emotive voice and composition skilfully straddles the cultural divide resulting in an alternative folk-rock sound that creates a melodic and meaningful listening experience.

“Whenever people hear Lie lie lie, they cannot believe that it’s my song or that it’s a Zambian artist. I have taken my musical experiences from when I was growing up in Kitwe and fused them with an acoustic sound that comes naturally to me, in the process creating my own sound,” Moonga explains.

Music lovers can listen to Lie lie lie on Soundcloud or download it on iTunes. For those who want to read the lyrics first, Where to Now? is available through Amazon.com and Kobobooks.com. Print copies can be ordered directly from the publishers, e.s books by sending an email to info@escp.co.za or visiting www.32lyrics.com.

WHERE TO NOW? NOW ON SALE 

“One of the most impressive works released by a young African author/lyricist in recent times.”  Adv.  Nick Matzukis

“This is a must have for all poetry lovers out there.” Suzette Engelbrecht

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If you would like to interview Moonga Mkandawire, please send an email to info@escp.co.za

Muyamwa
Muyamwa
Muyamwa

VICE-PRESIDENT Guy Scott has called on Zambians to emulate the hard work and patriotism exhibited by late former broadcaster and artiste Charles Muyamwa, who died in Pretoria, South Africa, aged 69.

Dr Scott described the late Mr Muyamwa as a ‘voice of the voiceless’ and a reservoir of knowledge whose contribution to the media and arts industry would be greatly missed.

He was speaking during a requiem service for the late Mr Muyamwa at Saint Ignatius Catholic Church in Lusaka yesterday.

The funeral service was attended by hundreds of mourners who included Information and Broadcasting Services Minister Mwansa Kapeya, artistes, senior Government officials and politicians.
“Mr Muyamwa was not only a role model to his family and the broadcasting industry but also to the country at large,” Dr Scott said.

He said Mr Muyamwa’s contribution to the growth of broadcasting services was well known and difficult to measure.
The Vice-President appealed to upcoming artistes and broadcasters to emulate Mr Muyamwa’s works for them to excel and inspire Government to continue investing in the growth of the arts industry.

“On behalf of President Sata and the People of Zambia, I wish to convey my deep felt condolences to the widow and the family of Mr Muyamwa over their loss,” he said.

Mr Muyamwa’s wife, Patricia described her late husband as a cultured man who exhibited great creativity.
She said Mr Muyamwa was a wonderful and loving husband who showed her great love and strength, and prepared her to stand firm on her own.

Mr Muyamwa was put to rest at Leopard’s Hill Memorial Park in Lusaka. He is survived by a wife and seven children.TIMES

Imp - -Hard At Work

By Anonymous

Imp - -Hard At Work
Imp – -Hard At Work

I had really hoped he meant Jordan (Impi) had been moved to another ward, as was a common
occurrence during his month long battle in hospital. So I asked what he meant…

“Jordan’s gone.”

And with that I hung up and ran for the ward, having missed his last breath by ten minutes. I know
this all sounds very dramatic, but it’s the way it was. Impi’s conditions had a lot of ups and downs
during his time at the University Teaching Hospital, and though I always feared what seemed to be
the inevitable, it still came as an almighty shock.

Jordan really is gone. He died somewhere between 2:30 and 3:30pm on Friday, January 24th
2014.

His funeral procession at the Lusaka Playhouse followed on Monday, and it was quite a sight.
Hundreds showed in mourning; countless Zambian musicians; a wealth of extended family members.
The auditorium was overcrowded and the emotions were overflowing. The eulogies given by his
close friends were a treasure; the covers of Impi songs performed by his fellow musicians were
goose-pimple-inducing; the event, organized by the Zambian Association of Musicians (ZAM) was a
glorious send off. It seemed no expense was spared.

And now I have to ask a difficult question. A question that has burned inside of me from the time
before Impi’s passing; when I would sit by his side and wipe the sweat from his brow. A question
nobody wants me to pose; “let the man rest in peace now”, they will say. Let us forgive and
forget. Jordan, most of all, would have expected this of me.

My question is this: why were so many there after he had died, yet almost no one was there when
he was dying in hospital? Impi is at peace now – and I need not push the point home. Although this
terrible wound deserves all the salt poured into it that I can muster, I’ll leave my inquisition posed
as mere questions. Who of us showed him how much we loved him when he was dying in hospital
for a whole month? Who of us thinks it’s right that we ignore the dying until they are dead? Surely
Impi, of all people, deserved to have seen and felt that love before he passed.

Some of us did give Impi that small mercy when he lay there on his hospital bed; witnessing him
fight with sheer verve and unrelenting nerve. And, of course, many more showed it to him when he
was up and about; traversing Lusaka and sharing his passion, love, and glowing personality with us.
Impi’s message was one of love. And it is clear he was loved by many. I hope we will remember this
person. One of Impi’s closest friends thanked me recently for believing in Jordan’s potential, but he
got it wrong. As far as I am, and always will be concerned, Jordan had realised his potential in his
lifetime. There was nothing to be believed in. The man was a force of nature; and his incredible
voice, songwriting, and music is testament to a man risen to the very heights of his artistic
potentiality.

I would say, rather, that Impi believed in me. He believed in all of us. And I am sure he never lost
that faith in his dying days, even if I did. Knowing that, and meditating on it now, is enough to let
me forgive and forget as my brother would have wanted me to.

Thank you all: the musicians, the producers, the friends and the family, that gave this man one hell
of a life. A life worth remembering. A life we should all aspire to emulate.

Enjoy the video of the song born and bred Zambian Work. Big improvement.

 Song Produced by Shom-C, Zambia’s new great producer, produced hit songs for the likes of ZoneFam the business, Ozzy, SlapD, Cleo Ice Queen. He is  currently working with a group of young talented Rap Artiste called Sik Wit it.

 Video was shot by Lloydee XyZ crew member, a talented video producer.

 Enjoy and please send me a feedback for more information.