Fashion

Emirates Country Manager Husain Alsafi (centre) flanked by professional polo players Ashvini Sharma (right) and Vishal Chauhan, flown in to Lusaka from India by the airline for the international Polo Safari tournament, and accompanied by Emirates Customer Sales and Service Agents Diana Snapper and Sophie Chinkumbi.
Emirates Country Manager Husain Alsafi (centre) flanked by professional polo players Ashvini Sharma (right) and Vishal Chauhan, flown in to Lusaka from India by the airline for the international Polo Safari tournament, and accompanied by Emirates Customer Sales and Service Agents Diana Snapper and Sophie Chinkumbi.

Emirates, which flies daily direct from Lusaka to Dubai and Harare, is bringing together fans of the exciting and glamorous sport of polo for the Polo Safari Tournament in Lusaka this weekend.

The event at the Showgrounds runs between June 13 and 15 and features professional players from India, flown in for the occasion courtesy of Emirates, who will join teams from Zambia and Zimbabwe.

This is the second time that the airline has sponsored the prestigious event, which has been an annual fixture in Lusaka for more than 20 years and is expected to attract more than 500 spectators each day.

Emirates is also sponsoring a prize from the tournament’s best playing pony, to be presented by the airline on the final day of the event on Sunday, June 15.

The international Polo Safari event brings together six top-ranking polo Zambian teams, each backed by a leading international “high goal” player, for three-days of thrilling, fast-paced matches.

The “Sport of Kings” will also be interspersed with a series of social events, including a cocktail reception, ball and lunch, which will ensure the tournament is at the top of the social calendar for VIPs, business people, socialites, celebrities and glitterati.

“Emirates is proud to be connecting local fans to this exhilarating sport on a global scale. We understand how passionate the sport can be and we share the united passion for polo. We look forward to involving the wider community in activities throughout this sponsorship,” said Emirates Country Manager for Zambia Husain Alsafi.

News of the Emirates sponsorship was welcomed by the Lusaka Polo Club Vice Captain Rosamund Vincent, who said: “Polo is an international game that unites people of many nationalities and backgrounds. Emirates’ commitment to the tournament puts Lusaka firmly on the international map for the sport.”

Emirates’ daily direct flights from Lusaka and Dubai are served by an Airbus A340-300 that offer 267 seats: 12 luxurious sleeper seats in First Class, 42 deep-reclining seats in Business Class and 213 in Economy Class.

About Emirates

Emirates connects people and places around the globe. Based in Dubai, Emirates is one of the world’s most recognised airline brands through its support of premier sports and cultural events. Emirates has been inspiring travel and facilitating trade between Zambia and the world since 2012. Its daily direct flights from Lusaka to Harare and Dubai connect Zambia to over 140 destinations across six continents. Exports carried out of Lusaka and Harare include fresh flowers, fruit, vegetables and copper mining industry by-products.

On-board its modern and efficient fleet of 218 aircraft, Emirates offers award-winning comfort and service, delivered by friendly cabin crew representing over 130 nationalities.  On the ground, Emirates connects millions of people each year through its other operations including Emirates Holidays, its destination marketing arm, and tour operator Arabian Adventures. For more information see www.emirates.com

WINNERS: Tashian Shaw and Tameka Saul pose with pageant organiser Alicia Martina Hixon, centre
WINNERS: Tashian Shaw and Tameka Saul pose with pageant organiser Alicia Martina Hixon, centre
WINNERS: Tashian Shaw and Tameka Saul pose with pageant organiser Alicia Martina Hixon, centre

TASHIAN SHAW, 22, from Birmingham and Tameka Saul, 21, from London, were crowned Mr and Miss Black Beauty UK 2014 at the first staging of the unique pageant at Walthamstow Town Hall, east London, earlier this month.

The winners were the crowd and the judges favourite as they beat off a strong line up of contestants who represented the countries of the Caribbean and Africa.

Tashian who is a specialist in the motor trade and car production field, represented St Kitts and Nevis, while Tameka who is currently studying Travel and Hospitality Management at university, represented Guyana.

They both won an education scholarship worth £5,000 from Christ College London, modelling photo-shoots and many more prizes.

The night started with 19 contestants vying for the titles and who were judged by their national costumes, knowledge of their homeland, swim wear and evening wear designs.

But as the evening progressed, Tashian and Tameka started to shine from the others and were eventually crowned winners before a packed town hall of High Commissioners, sports and entertainment celebrities and supporters.

Pageant Founder Alicia Martina Hixon said the event was created to honour black beauty, raise awareness for the minority cultural heritage, community significance with a mission to promote educational opportunities and develop leadership among young black men and women in the UK.

Since winning the crowns, Tashian and Tameka have joined together to stage an evening of entertainment and cultural activities on Saturday, May 31 at the Adulis Restaurant, 44-46 Brixton Road, London SW9 to help raise funds for charities in St Kitts and Nevis and Guyana.

ukboarder
Vitalis Madanhi
Vitalis Madanhi

ON MARCH 26, 2013, the UK Court of Appeal handed down a ruling in which it had occasion to consider the recent past and present position regarding Zimbabwean asylum seekers. The case is referred to as SS and others.

In particular the court considered the impact of the decision in the case of RT Zimbabwe, RN Zimbabwe and the case of EM Zimbabwe which has been restated in the case of CM Zimbabwe which happens to be the present country guidance case to be followed in asylum matters regarding Zimbabweans.

It is a feature of all the seven appeals considered in the case of SS and others that the appellants were found not to be credible in the version of events they put forward to the tribunal. A further feature of these appeals is the extent to which such findings of want of credibility may impact on what the Secretary of State says is a question of fact common to each appeal: that is, whether it remains necessary for the appellants (if returned to Zimbabwe) to demonstrate loyalty to Zanu PF to ensure safety from persecution.

The Secretary of State says that the findings of lack of credibility do, or may well, impact on the ultimate determination of the asylum claims. Thus the issue of credibility was duly examined as key to the success and or otherwise of a claim for asylum.

The court in turn considered first the impact of the decision of RT (Zimbabwe). In order to properly explain where the parties are at issue and in order to determine the proper disposal of each of the appeals on their own particular circumstances, it was necessary first to consider the ambit and implications of the decision in RT (Zimbabwe).

In that case, each of the Zimbabwean claimants had been found (contrary to their protestations in some of the cases) not to hold any political beliefs; but it was also found by the tribunal that they could and would, if necessary, be able to demonstrate loyalty to President Robert Mugabe’s Zanu PF party and therefore there was no real risk that they would be subject to ill-treatment if returned to Zimbabwe.

However, the core decision of the Supreme Court, applying the principles laid down in HJ (Iran) v SSHD [2010] UKSC 31[2011] 1AC 596, was to the effect that there was no basis for treating differently a person who had no political beliefs, but who, in order to avoid persecution, would be obliged to pretend that he did, from a person who did have active political beliefs and who, in order to avoid persecution, would be obliged to conceal them.

A simple assessment of credibility becomes essential at all times when a claim is made. An appellant who has been found not to be a witness of truth in respect of the factual basis of his claim will not be assumed to be truthful about his inability to demonstrate loyalty to the regime simply because he asserts that. The burden remains on the appellant throughout to establish the facts upon which he seeks to rely.

 But care must be taken in respect of such an appellant who has chosen to put forward a wholly untruthful account in support of his claim. The standard of proof he must meet is not a demanding one. As was pointed out in GM & YT (Eritrea) v SSHD [2008] EWCA Civ 833, per Buxton LJ at paragraph 31:

‘In every case it is still necessary to consider, despite the failure of the applicant to help himself by giving a true or any account of his own experiences, whether there is a reasonable likelihood of persecution on return.’”

That lack of credibility may be of key importance in any given case seems to be borne out by the actual disposals of the four cases by the Supreme Court. RT was found to be credible. It was accepted that she was apolitical and that she would be returned to a milieu where there was a real risk she would face hostile questioning which she could not truthfully answer. It was for that reason that the appeal of RT was allowed. By way of contrast, the appeals of SM and AM were remitted in circumstances where each had been found not to be credible.

In the cases of SS and others the common thread has been the fact that the appellants were not credible at all and their appeals had been considered in different courts before the matters were eventually considered by the court of appeal. The court of appeal remitted back to the Upper tribunal for reassessment. A quick summary of all the material issues in each case is outlined below highlighting matters requiring further evaluation. The material matters arising should be considered and effectively dealt with by anyone seeking to make an asylum claim afresh and or on appeal.

SS

In the case of SS, permission to appeal to the Court of Appeal was refused by the Upper Tribunal. Permission to appeal was granted by Sir Richard Buxton on 19 July 2011 on the basis that, having regard to RN (Zimbabwe), the ambit of the approach based on credibility raised a point for consideration and also on the basis of the subsequent developments in the RT (Zimbabwe) litigation as to whether a person should be expected to lie about his political beliefs.

The court then ruled that the appeal should not be dismissed outright. First, it may be necessary (among other things) to consider the true extent of SS’s political convictions: his sur place MDC activities were described as being solely to bolster his claim (as well as being found not likely to attract attention). The evidence could be consistent with him being in truth a continuing Zanu-PF supporter (and so not required to lie if questioned): but no express finding, either way, on that point has yet been made. Further, more consideration may be needed as to the milieu of his return, since that might bear on the risk of his being interrogated at all.

JS

This client had limited surplice activity in support of her asylum case. But there was no finding that such (limited) sur place activities as she undertook had come or would come to the attention of the authorities, indeed the implication of Immigration Judge Chambers’ decision was to the contrary. Nor was there any finding that she was not, or would be perceived not to be, associated with the regime. But the court observed that, where PN’s own evidence in all material respects was disbelieved and where (in the light of RT (Zimbabwe)) it can be said that further findings were needed, including on the issue of milieu, one cannot say that the appeal would be bound to succeed. EM (Zimbabwe), as restated in CM (Zimbabwe), was the applicable country guidance and would create a huddle for JS.

BC

This case too was remitted to the Upper Tribunal. The Immigration Judge found that the sur place activities would not become known. But the Immigration Judge did not, apparently, regard that as conclusive and went on to say that in any event the authorities would be “likely” to find such activities as “insincere”. The court observed that the Immigration Judge did not (because of the view she took) make a finding as to whether BC was indeed a Zanu-PF supporter in reality and so did not consider whether she would be required to lie or be unable to demonstrate loyalty if stopped.

SM

It is to be noted that SM had accepted that he had once been a Zanu-PF member and had formerly worked for the government in its security unit. It may be that findings are required as to whether or not he was in truth still a Zanu-PF supporter, or at least likely to be perceived as such: and to explore whether he would be at any real risk of being stopped and interrogated or (if so) whether he would be required to lie or be unable to demonstrate loyalty. Questions of any risk would need also to be assessed by appropriate findings as to the milieu to which he would be returned.

SC

There was no consideration made about whether this appellant would be required to lie to assure his safety. It may well be said – as Ward LJ did – that a first step would be to assess whether he would be at risk of being stopped and interrogated: and it could be said that the findings of fact thus far tend to gainsay such a risk.

It cannot possibly be said that the appeal, if remitted, would be bound to succeed: indeed the findings thus far made suggest serious problems for SC’s case. In any event, the true extent of SC’s political convictions remains to be explored, as does a full assessment of the milieu to which he would be returned. It may also be noted that he has a mother and siblings and family network in Zimbabwe, who it is said have suffered no persecution; and the Immigration Judge had found it would be safe for him to return to them. This case was also remitted to the Upper tribunal for a rehearing on these points.

CM (Zimbabwe)

This determination of the Upper Tribunal (Blake J, Upper Tribunal Judge Lane and Deputy Upper Tribunal Judge Campbell) was promulgated on 31st January 2013. This is presently the current country guidance case on Zimbabwe. Basically it restates the case of EM Zimbabwe. It is of course a most detailed determination, with voluminous appendices.

i) The country guidance in EM (Zimbabwe) on the position in Zimbabwe as at the end of January 2011 was not vitiated. It was held that the tribunal had there been entitled to find that there had been durable change since RN (Zimbabwe).

ii) The only change required to the EM (Zimbabwe) country guidance arose from the Supreme Court decision in RT (Zimbabwe): see para 214.

iii) It was found that there was cogent evidence of a downward trend in politically motivated human rights violations in Zimbabwe; and there was no evidence to suggest that the nationwide findings made in RN (Zimbabwe) with regard to the risk of having to show loyalty to Zanu-PF continued to apply (paras 194-195).

The determination in CM (Zimbabwe), in effect endorsing the country guidance given in EM (Zimbabwe), makes it difficult for the appeals remitted to the Upper tribunal to succeed. Clearly there are – in the light now of CM (Zimbabwe) – potentially formidable obstacles in the way of each appellant. Their cases remain to be assessed on their individual facts, in the light of RT (Zimbabwe) as well as of the country guidance contained in EM (Zimbabwe) as restated in CM (Zimbabwe). In all the circumstances any one claiming asylum should take note of the above analogies and what the courts actually look at and to be credible as this is also important.

Vitalis Madanhi is the Principal solicitor of Bake and CO Solicitors, a firm specializing in Immigration and asylum law in Birmingham, UK. He can be contacted at vmadanhi@bakesolicitors.co.uk, Phone 01216165025, mobile 07947866649 www.bakesolicitors.co.uk

Disclaimer: This article only provides general information and guidance. It is not in any way intended to replace or substitute the advice of any solicitor or advisor. Each case depends on its facts. The writer will not accept any liability for any claims or inconvenience as a result of the use of this information. /NEWZIMBABWE

Emeli Sande
Emeli Sande
Emeli Sande
Emeli Sande

EMELI Sande has thanked her Zambian roots for influencing her musical talents.
The Heaven singer, whose mother is English and whose father is Zambian, grew up in the UK, but African culture largely influenced her during her childhood.
She revealed: “At home, Dad always spoke of a relative in Zambia, either his auntie or his grandmother, who used to go into these musical trances. She’d be busy cooking and then suddenly starts singing.

“He’d say I reminded him of her because I’d start singing and that would be it until the end of the night. So I feel that side of me comes from my Zambian ancestry.”
Emeli also admitted that growing up as a mixed race child in a white neighbourhood made her struggle to fit in and cites music as helping her to find her identity.
Here is a write-up from her official website:
“You are a 23-year-old from rural northern Scotland. Piano has been your instrument, your songwriting tool, since you were ten; your voice has been remarkable for even longer. A tattoo of artist Frida Kahlo – a typically single-minded, forthright heroine runs the length of your right forearm.
Some of the greatest names in modern pop have sung your thrustingly exciting compositions: Tinie Tempah (Let Go), Professor Green (Kids That Love To Dance), Tinchy Stryder (Let It Rain), Chipmunk (Diamond Rings), Wiley (Never Be Your Woman). You’ve also written for divas big (Susan Boyle), small (Cheryl Cole) and medium-sized (The Saturdays). Your dad (from Zambia) and your mum (from Cumbria), who schooled you in music and encouraged your ambitions, are already proud.
Then there are the richly melodic, classically powerful, retro-futurist soul-pop songs you’ve written for your own debut album. Your love for – and understanding of – Nina Simone, Joni Mitchell and Lauryn Hill are obvious, loud and proud.
Then there’s the stuff you did in your ‘spare time’: three-quarters of a six-year degree in medicine at Glasgow University. You specialised in Clinical Neuro-Science, “cause I really like all the brain stuff.”
You are Emeli Sande, and you also really like all the soul stuff, all the heart stuff, and all the emotional stuff. Not many people knew it, but you were behind some of the key pop tracks of recent years. Now you’re about to be the voice in front of the freshest debut of 2012.
Since its release in February, ‘Our Version of Events’ has gone on to become UK’s biggest selling debut album of 2012 so far, winning Emeli this year’s coveted BRITs Critics’ Choice Award, securing her a slot on Coldplay’s US tour and at Coca-Cola’s Olympic Torch Relay City Celebrations. – /Zambia Daily Mail/Sbtv/emelisande.com.

Justina Mutale, African Woman of the Year 2012 is to be honoured as Africa Goodwill Ambassador during the 2014 African Goodwill Awards ceremony on Saturday 12th April 2014 at the Radisson Hotel, LAX in Los Angeles, California.

Justina Mutale (seated) flanked by (Left) - Rev. Brenda Girton-Mitchell, Director, White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighbourhood Partnerships, U.S. Department of Education; and (right) Judy Matthews, Chair, National Congress of Black Women, Inc. Los Angeles).
Justina Mutale (seated) flanked by (Left) – Rev. Brenda Girton-Mitchell, Director, White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighbourhood Partnerships, U.S. Department of Education; and (right) Judy Matthews, Chair, National Congress of Black Women, Inc. Los Angeles).

The African Goodwill Awards is an annual award ceremony organised and hosted by African Focus Inc, an American non-profit organization, whose core objectives revolve around the crisis in Africa with a mission to promote Intercultural Exchange, Education and Economic Development of Africa. The Award ceremony highlights the accomplishments as well as challenges facing African Diaspora humanitarian organizations, individuals, and groups that are working in a difficult environment in their mission to provide hope to the African Poor.

“Through the Africa Goodwill Awards, we aim to deliver a strong message of hope that touches hearts, lifts spirits, and inspires the African Diaspora community and the general public to participate in efforts to help the African poor”, says Mr. Uchenna Nworgu, CEO of Africa Focus Inc. and organizer of the Africa Goodwill Awards.

Ms Mutale is the Founder/CEO of POSITIVE RUNWAY: Global Catwalk to Stop the Spread, an international social development organisation registered with the United Nations Department for Social and Economic Affairs (UNDESA) Civil Society Database. POSITIVE RUNWAY also boasts membership of various international and global organisations including the People’s Global Action on Migration, Development and Human Rights; The Bond Network, which represents the largest household names in the UK International Development Sector, who influence key decision-makers at national, European and global levels; and the ENOUGH FOOD FOR EVERYONE IF Campaign, a coalition of leading UK development organisations working to end world hunger. POSITIVE RUNWAY runs a worldwide HIV/AIDS response, which spans 6 continents across the globe to bridge the gap in the global efforts to stop the spread of HIV/AIDS by speaking the same language as the 21st century generation.

Previous recipients of the African Goodwill Award include Ziggy Marley, the son of legendary reggae artists Bob Marley. Other recipients of the 2014 Awards include Barbara Morrison, an African-American Soul and Jazz Singer; Dawn Sutherland, Vice President of Southern California/Las Vegas Operations of the United States Client Operations division at Xerox Corporation; Mohammad Yahaya, a visionary leader and pathfinder boasting multi-million dollar capital projects in construction; Barbara Goldberg, Founder of Salon Forum and Responsive Research Inc; Dr Joseph A. Bailey II, Medical Doctor, Inventor of Orthopedic Appliances and Author of medical journals and text books; George C. Fraser, Chairman of FraserNet, a global network bringing together human resources to increase opportunities for people of African descent; and Lara Okunubi, Nigerian Banker and Entrepreneur.

“Each individual has been part of a cause of breaking barriers, providing emotional, moral and financial support to empower members of the African community to the betterment of their lives and that of their families”, said Mr Nworgu

In addition to the Goodwill Awards, the ceremony unites Continental Africans and Africans in the Diaspora to create an opportunity for dialogue. The African Family Induction ceremony acts as a medium through which Africans separated by slavery can come together in solidarity and in celebration of a common heritage. Countries represented in this year’s Family Induction Ceremony include Nigeria, Zambia, Senegal, Ghana, Cameroon and Uganda welcoming 29 African-American inductees. The reunited families will share in the rich culture of the host family through African fashion, music and dance.

Among the cultural highlights of the ceremony will be the blessings of two African Kings from Nigeria, His Royal Highness Igwe Sylvester Ozoekwem, Traditional Ruler of Umumba Ndiuno of Enugu State; and his Royal Highness Igwe Ezebuilo Ozobu OFR, Traditional Ruler of Umuagba Owa, Ezea-gu and Chief Judge Emeritus of Enugu State.

“It is a great honour and privileged to be recognised as Africa Goodwill Ambassador in the presence of such high profile personalities and African Royalty”, says Justina Mutale

Photo: Justina Mutale (seated) flanked by (Left) – Rev. Brenda Girton-Mitchell, Director, White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighbourhood Partnerships, U.S. Department of Education; and (right) Judy Matthews, Chair, National Congress of Black Women, Inc. Los Angeles).

Gemfields logo

Gemfields, which owns 75 per cent of the Kagem Mine – the world’s largest emerald mine – in Lufwanyama District in partnership with the Zambian government, has revealed very strong first-half financial results, with a 137 per cent increase in revenues to US$65.7 million and a pleasing EBITDA figure for the period of US$18 million.

The company also highlighted that Kagem is now a fully tax paying entity and distributed its first dividend to Zambian Government in December.

Demand for coloured gemstones remained upbeat as clearly indicated by the record per carat prices the company continues to achieve at its auctions in Lusaka.

Financial Highlight 

  • Revenue for the period of US$65.7 million (2012: US$27.7 million);
  • EBITDA for the period of US$18.0 million (2012: US$19.5 million);
  • Net profit after tax for the period US$1.4 million (2012: US$4.7 million);
  • Cash in hand at 31 December 2013 of US$14.8 million (30 June 2013: US$11.2 million); and
  • Estimated cost of inventory at hand, excluding fuel and other consumables, of US$69.3 million (30 June 2013: US$76.3 million).

 Operational Highlights

 Emeralds

  • Production summary for 75% owned Kagem Mining Limited (“Kagem”) in Zambia for the period:
    • Production of 10.4 million carats of emerald and beryl (2012: 14.5 million carats);
    • Grade of  267 carats per tonne (2012: 271 carats per tonne);
    • Unit production costs of US$0.85 per carat (2012: US$0.57 per carat). On a cash basis, production costs increased to US$1.32 per carat (2012: US$1.12 per carat); and
    • Cash rock handling unit costs of US$3.52 per tonne (2012: US$3.36 per tonne).
    • Rough sales and auctions:
      • July 2013 auction of predominantly higher quality rough emeralds, held in Lusaka, Zambia, yielded aggregate revenues of US$31.5 million, the second highest aggregate auction revenues achieved to date and with a record average price of US$54.00 per carat;
      • September 2013 auction of traded rough emeralds (not obtained directly from the Company’s own mining operations) yielded US$8.5 million;
      • Kagem finalised a US$3.5 million direct sale in respect of 11,286 kilograms of Kagem’s lowest two grades of beryl in October 2013; and
      • November 2013 auction of predominantly lower quality rough emerald and beryl set records for aggregate revenues at US$16.4 million and unit prices at US$3.32 per carat, a 27% unit price increase over the previous record for similar quality gemstones.
      • In October 2013, the Mines Safety Department of Zambia awarded Kagem a certificate recognising more than 2.8 million reportable injury-free shifts, believed to be a record in the Zambian mining industry; and
      • In December 2013, Kagem paid its first ever dividend of US$8 million, of which US$2 million was paid to the Government of the Republic of Zambia, a 25% shareholder in Kagem.

 Rubies

  • Bulk sampling summary for 75% owned Montepuez Ruby Mining Limitada (“Montepuez”) in Mozambique for the period:
    • Approximately 5.1 million carats of ruby and corundum extracted (2012: 0.16 million carats) taking the total ruby and corundum extracted to 7.0 million carats;
    • Total rock handling was 525,307 tonnes, made up of 232,745 tonnes of ore and 292,562 tonnes of waste (2012: 12,371 tonnes); and
    • Total cash operating costs of US$4.8 million (2012: US$2.0 million); and
    • ‘First-of-a-kind’ comprehensive grading and sorting framework for rough rubies completed, with ongoing refinement.

Fabergé

  • Wholly-owned Fabergé Limited (“Fabergé”) saw revenue derived from sales and sales orders agreed during the key Christmas shopping month of December increased by 89% year-on-year;
  • Robert Benvenuto joined Fabergé as President and COO on 28 October 2013;
  • New advertising campaign entitled ‘The Art of Colour’ unveiled, supporting the Gemfields coloured gemstone strategy; and
  • Preview for long-lead press in October 2013 of “The Fabergé Big Egg Hunt” which is scheduled to take place in New York from 1 to 26 April 2014 in collaboration with leading artists and designers, and which will see up to 300 egg sculptures displayed throughout the city to raise funds for charities ‘Studio in a School’ and ‘Elephant Family’.

Marketing

  • Partnership with Mila Kunis enjoyed increased visibility during the period, with the advertising campaign running from March to December 2013 in luxury consumer titles, digital and trade publications in the UK, US, India, South Africa and Zambia;
  • Mila Kunis wore jewellery featuring Gemfields emeralds at premieres and film festivals;
  • International promotional initiatives implemented with retailers Couture Lab, Stone & Strand, and Stephen Webster; and
  • Gemfields worked alongside Thames & Hudson in the promotion of its recently published book, ‘Emerald’.

Outlook and post reporting period events

  • Successful high quality emerald auction held in Lusaka, Zambia, in February 2014 achieving record revenues of US$36.5 million and record average price per carat of US$59.31;
  • An additional emerald auction and our first ruby auction are scheduled for the second half of the financial year ending 30 June 2014;
  • Revenues at Fabergé, derived from sales and sales orders agreed during the month of January continued the trend experienced in December 2013, showing an increase of 198% year-on-year;
  • Other key Fabergé events for the second half of the financial year are:
    • Presentation of some of our newest jewellery collections at the ‘Doha Jewellery and Watches Exhibition’ from 24 February to 2 March 2014 at the Qatar National Convention Center in the Qatari capital was well received; and
    • “The Fabergé Easter” promotional and sales event scheduled to take place from 1 to 21 April 2014 in the world famous Harrods department store, where Fabergé will be well represented in addition to its existing retail footprint via an exclusive salon and added exhibition space; and
    • The “mine and market” strategy continues to gain traction as is evidenced by the record prices achieved at the recent auctions.

Ian Harebottle, CEO of Gemfields, commented:

“Gemfields has delivered a very strong first half with a 137% increase in revenues to US$65.7 million and a pleasing EBITDA figure for the period of US$18 million. We have absorbed not only the increased cash requirements from our more recent growth projects, but also the fact that Kagem is now a fully tax paying entity and has distributed its first dividend to our partners in Kagem, the Government of the Republic of Zambia. Demand for coloured gemstones remained upbeat as is clearly indicated by the record per carat prices we continue to achieve.

Production at our Kagem mine in Zambia performed to expectations and the inclusion of Fabergé into the Gemfields group has seen the levels of our inventory stock reach US$69 million. In Mozambique, our bulk sampling programme at our Montepuez project had an excellent first half producing over five million carats of rubies and corundum. As a result, our strategy of offering rubies to our customers via our auction platform remains on track for the second half of this financial year.

Gemfields’ next chapter as a leading producer, marketer and retailer of emeralds, rubies and other precious coloured gemstones is set to be accelerated in the short term and we look forward to building on our successes to date, underpinned by our broadening footprint, encouraging consumer demand  and our exceptional team, to whom I am eternally grateful.”

 

Deputy Minister of Mines, Energy and Water Development Hon. Charles Zulu receives a copy of a book on emeralds from Ian Harebottle, CEO of Kagem Mining and Gemfields Plc
Deputy Minister of Mines, Energy and Water Development Hon. Charles Zulu receives a copy of a book on emeralds from Ian Harebottle, CEO of Kagem Mining and Gemfields Plc

The following statement was issued by Gemfields plc via the London Stock Exchange’s Regulatory News Service this morning:

Gemfields plc

(“Gemfields” or the “Company”)

Results – Lusaka Rough Emerald and Beryl Auction

Gemfields plc (AIM: GEM) is pleased to announce the results of its auction of predominantly higher quality rough emerald and beryl held in Lusaka, Zambia from 21 to 25 February 2014.

Highlights

  • Auction revenues of USD 36.5 million, a record for any Gemfields auction;
  • Average price of USD 59.31 per carat, a 10% increase on the previous Kagem auction record;
  • Of the 0.84 million carats offered, 0.62 million carats were sold;
  • Fifteen Kagem auctions held since July 2009 have generated USD 260 million in total revenues;
  • Financial year-to-date auction revenues (including one auction of traded material) stand at USD 92.9 million; and
  • Including a direct sale of the two lowest grades of beryl, total revenues in the financial year-to-date from rough emerald and beryl sales have reached USD 96.4 million, marking a record revenue year for Gemfields.

A total of 34 companies attended and bid in what was the third auction during the current financial year of gemstones mined by Gemfields from the Kagem emerald mine in Zambia.

The auction saw 0.84 million carats of emerald and beryl extracted from Kagem placed on offer, with 15 of the 17 lots offered being sold, generating record auction revenues of USD 36.5 million.

The auction yielded an overall average value of USD 59.31 per carat, a 10% increase on the prior record for Kagem auctions. Market conditions for higher qualities remain robust, yielding solid increases in quality-for-quality per carat prices.

Aggregate auction revenues for the financial year-to-date (which ends 30 June 2014) – and inclusive of the Jaipur auction of traded emeralds – stand at USD 92.9 million. Adding a direct sale of the two lowest grades of beryl, total revenues from the sale of rough emerald and beryl have reached USD 96.4 million. As such, Gemfields has exceeded its record annual revenue figure of USD 83.7 million, set in the year ending 30 June 2012. Two further auctions are presently scheduled to take place before the end of the financial year including the inaugural auction for rough rubies and corundum from the Montepuez ruby deposit in Mozambique.

The Company’s fifteen auctions of emeralds and beryl mined at Kagem since July 2009 have generated USD 260 million in aggregate revenues. In addition, the Company ran an auction of traded rough emeralds (emeralds obtained by Gemfields in the open market from various sources and excluding emerald or beryl mined, processed, graded and exported by, or belonging to, Kagem Mining Limited) in Jaipur, India in September 2013, yielding gross auction revenues of USD 8.5 million.

The results of the nine higher quality Kagem auctions held to date are summarised in the two tables below:

AUCTION RESULTS  (HIGHER QUALITY)Table 1 of 2 JUL ’09 AUCTION NOV ’09 AUCTION JUL ’10 AUCTION DEC ’10 AUCTION   JUL ’11 AUCTION   MAR ‘ 12 AUCTION
Dates 20-24 Jul ‘09 23-27 Nov ‘09 19-23 Jul ‘10 6-10 Dec ‘10 11-15 Jul ‘11 19-23 Mar ‘12
Location London, UK Johannesburg, SA London, UK Johannesburg, SA Singapore Singapore
Type Higher Quality Higher Quality Higher Quality Higher Quality Higher Quality Higher Quality
Carats offered 1.36 million 1.12 million 0.85 million 0.87 million 1.07 million 0.77 million
Carats Sold 1.36 million 1.09 million 0.80 million 0.75 million 0.74 million 0.69 million
No. of companies placing bids 23 19 37 32 38 29
Average no. of bids per lot 10 13 18 16 16 11
No. of lots offered 27 19 27 19 25 23
No. of lots sold 26 14 24 18 18 20
Percentage of lots sold 96% 74% 89% 95% 72% 87%
Percentage of lots sold by weight 99.8% 97% 94% 86% 69% 89%
Percentage of lots sold by value 82% 76% 87% 99% 91% 94%
Total sales realised at auction USD 5.9 million USD 5.6 million USD 7.5 million USD 19.6 million USD 31.6 million USD 26.2 million
Average per carat sales value USD 4.40/carat USD 5.10/carat USD 9.35/carat USD 26.20/carat USD 42.71/carat USD 38.25/carat

 

AUCTION RESULTS 

(HIGHER QUALITY)

Table 2 of 2

 

NOV ’12 AUCTION

 

 

JUL ’13 AUCTION

 

 

FEB ’14 AUCTION

 

Dates

29 Oct – 2 Nov ‘12

15-19 Jul ‘13

21-25 Feb ‘14

Location

Singapore

Lusaka

Lusaka

Type

Higher Quality

Higher Quality

Higher Quality

Carats offered

0.93 million

0.58 million

0.84 million

Carats Sold

0.90 million

0.58 million

0.62 million

No. of companies placing bids

35

36

34

Average no. of bids per lot

11

8

13

No. of lots offered

19

18

17

No. of lots sold

16

18

15

Percentage of lots sold

84%

100%

88%

Percentage of lots sold by weight

98%

100%

74%

Percentage of lots sold by value

90%

100%

86%

Total sales realised at auction

USD 26.8 million

USD 31.5 million

USD 36.5 million

Average per carat sales value

USD 29.71/carat

USD 54.00/carat

USD 59.31/carat

 

The specific auction mix and the exact quality of the lots offered at each auction vary in characteristics such as size, colour and clarity on account of mined production and market demand. Each auction is thus made up of somewhat differing overall quality compositions.

For ease of reference, the results of the six lower quality Kagem auctions held to date are summarised below:

 

  AUCTION RESULTS (LOWER QUALITY)

MAR ’10 AUCTION

MAR ’11 AUCTION

NOV ’11

AUCTION

JUN ’12

AUCTION

APR ’13

AUCTION

NOV ’13

AUCTION

Dates

11-15 Mar 2010

10-14 Mar 2011

21-25 Nov ‘11

9-13 Jun ‘12

15-19 Apr ‘13

11-15 Nov ‘13

Location

Jaipur, India

Jaipur, India

Jaipur, India

Jaipur, India

Lusaka, Zambia

Lusaka, Zambia

Type

Lower Quality

Lower Quality

Lower Quality

Lower Quality

Lower Quality

Lower Quality

Carats offered*

28.90 million

16.83 million

10.83 million

10.85 million

17.34 million

5.62 million

Carats Sold

22.80 million

12.98 million

9.82 million

3.47 million

6.30 million

4.94 million

No. of companies placing bids

25

44

27

20

25

20

Average no. of bids per lot

8

14

9

3

6

7

No. of lots offered

56

35

26

33

28

21

No. of lots sold

49

34

19

17

23

19

Percentage of lots sold

88%

97%

73%

52%

82%

90%

Percentage of lots sold by weight

79%

77%

91%

32%

36%

88%

Percentage of lots sold by value

89%

99%

80%

60%

76%

91%

Total sales realised at auction

USD 7.2 million

USD 10.0 million

USD 11.0 million

USD 9.0 million

USD 15.2 million

USD 16.4 million

Average per carat sales value

USD 0.31/carat

USD 0.77/carat

USD 1.12/carat

USD 2.61/carat

USD 2.42/carat

USD 3.32/carat

        * A larger volume of material was placed on offer in March 2010 following Gemfields extensive inventory building exercise during 2008 and 2009.

Ian Harebottle, CEO of Gemfields, commented:

“Gemfields has now completed four successful auctions in Zambia, all during the last eleven months. We have achieved two new records – the highest aggregate revenue and the highest average per carat price.

 Our commitment to our vision for precious coloured gemstones, our operational investments, the acquisition of Fabergé and our ever expanding international marketing endeavours are clearly furthering the momentum we have built during the last five years. Zambia’s role in the global emerald market has never been more important, with Zambian emeralds now favoured by many as the emerald of choice.

 Taking into account the four auctions held thus far this financial year, being one auction of traded material and three of material mined at our Kagem mine, Gemfields’ year-to-date auction revenues now stand at USD 92.9 million, with total sales from rough emerald and beryl having reached USD 96.4 million. This means we have, with four months and two further auctions remaining in this financial year (including our inaugural auction of rough rubies and corundum from Montepuez in Mozambique), already beaten Gemfields’ best ever revenue year.”

Gemfields plc is the leading coloured gemstone miner listed on the AIM market of the London Stock Exchange (ticker: GEM). The Company’s principal asset is the 75% owned Kagem emerald mine in Zambia, the world’s single largest emerald mine. In addition to the Kagem emerald mine, Gemfields has a 50% interest in the Kariba amethyst mine in Zambia.

In July 2009 Gemfields commenced a formal auction programme for Zambian emeralds mined at Kagem. To date, the Company has held 15 auctions which have generated revenues totalling USD 260 million.

The Company also owns a 75% stake in the highly prospective Montepuez ruby deposit in Mozambique and licences in Madagascar including ruby, emerald and sapphire deposits.

Gemfields acquired the Fabergé brand in January 2013 with a view to creating a globally recognised coloured gemstone champion. Fabergé provides Gemfields with direct control over a high-end luxury goods platform and a global brand with exceptional heritage.

 

 

Minister of Mines, Energy and Water Development Hon. Christopher Yaluma inspects one of the showpiece high grade emeralds at Kagem Mining's auction, which opened this week
Minister of Mines, Energy and Water Development Hon. Christopher Yaluma inspects one of the showpiece high grade emeralds at Kagem Mining's auction, which opened this week
Minister of Mines, Energy and Water Development Hon. Christopher Yaluma inspects one of the showpiece high grade emeralds at Kagem Mining’s auction, which opened this week

Kagem Mining Limited, Zambia’s largest emerald producer, has announced a US$1 million programme of social investment that includes upgrading of a clinic to hospital status, and the construction of a new secondary school in Lufwanyama District.

The company – which is pioneering the concept of ethical gemstone mining – is also stepping up its tree planting initiative and is investing heavily in the back-filling of mine excavation works in order to protect the environment.

“Kagem Mining is committed to working with all our stakeholders to improve the livelihoods of people in the communities in which we work. Education and health are key components of that vision, along with the conservation of our shared environment,” said Kagem chairman William B. Nyirenda, speaking at a stakeholders’ consultative meeting at Lufwanyama Council Chamber today (Monday February 3, 2014).

Under the two-year social investment scheme, which was approved by the Kagem board last month, the company will fund and construct a four-ward building at Nkana Clinic and add three nurses’ accommodation blocks, turning the facility into a “mini-hospital” US$250,000.

Kagem has also pledged to construct a complete US$700,000 new higher secondary school at Chapula and provide sports equipment to the existing primary school there.

The company’s motivation is to benefit the people of Lufwanyama, and by extension improve the well-being of its workers, their families and the wider community in which the emerald mine is located.

The extension of the clinic will give people improved access to more advanced healthcare facilities at local level, lessening the need to travel farther afield for more complicated medical attention. It will provide dedicated male, female and children’s wards, as well as a maternity unit, and will allow for 24-hour patient care.

Meanwhile, Kagem’s support for education has numerous benefits. It develops literacy levels, enhances productivity and good health, and enhancing the contribution of young people to society. Kagem aims to improve the learning environment for both pupils and teaching staff, thus also providing a pool of educated workers for future employment at the mine.

The company’s approach to its community development projects aims to ensure maximum impact through a long-term sustainable strategy which listens to the needs of local people and works hand-in-hand with community leaders, central and local government, non-governmental organisations and local residents.

The focus is on alleviating poverty and is aligned with government policies, objectives and targets as well as the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and Vision 2030.

To date Kagem has spent some K2.8 million on CSR projects, including provision of a ZESCO powerline, new buildings at Chapula Basic School, teachers’ accommodation at Kapila Community School, improvements to Chief Nkana and Chief Lumpuma’s Palaces, the Nkana Clinic, and the Blessings and Green Farm projects. The company has also paid for road upgrading and maintenance.

On the environmental side, Kagem has initiated a zero-carbon project to offset the carbon generated by its operations globally. A tree nursery has been established, tending some 100,000 tree saplings, and Kagem is working closely with the Forestry Department under the Ministry of Lands, Natural Resources and Environmental Protection on this.

Maintaining the environment is an on-going process for Kagem and its mining operations adopt an in-pit dumping method by which excavated rock and soil are used to back-fill previously mined sites, ensuring the mine footprint and environmental impact are minimised.

The ethical approach is all part of Kagem’s strategy to be at the forefront of developing the international market for Zambian emeralds by investing in exploration, mining, sales and marketing in order to develop a competitive, reliable and trusted source of ethically produced gemstones that buyers can rely on.

Ian Harebottle, CEO of Kagem and Gemfields, said: “Kagem is the flag-bearer of the Zambian gemstone sector, and one of the finest examples of what can be achieved in partnerships between government and foreign investors in the mining sphere. Our triple bottom line approach is a vital part of that, as we work to ensure maximum returns for all stakeholders in terms of financial, economic, social and environmental returns.”

 

About Kagem

 

Kagem Mining Ltd in Lufwanyama is part of the Gemfields group of companies, a leading gemstone miner listed on the Alternative Investment Market (AIM) of the London Stock Exchange (ticker: ‘GEM’). Gemfields owns 75 percent of the Kagem mine, in partnership with the Zambian government. In July 2009 Gemfields commenced a formal auction programme for its Zambian emeralds. To date, Gemfields has held 14 auctions which have generated revenues totalling US$224 million.

In addition to the Kagem emerald mine, Gemfields has a 50 percent interest in the Kariba amethyst mine in Zambia. The company also owns controlling stakes in highly prospective ruby deposits in Mozambique and various licenses in Madagascar including ruby, emerald and sapphires deposits.

Gemfields is the world’s foremost coloured gemstone producer, and is found at the intersection of exploration, mining and marketing.

Natural gems are at the heart of the operation. Its focus – reliable and ethically-produced Zambian emeralds – upholds fair-trade practices while remaining in accordance with the highest level of environmental, social and safety standards. This mission holds true for every gemstone in its portfolio.

Gemfields’ unprecedented mine-to-market strategy through transparent partnerships with the world’s leading coloured gemstones dealers and manufacturers allows it to guarantee the provenance of every gem: Its promise to both the trade and the consumer.

 

Actress Mila Kunis in Gemfields' new global campaign to promote Zambian emeralds
Actress Mila Kunis in Gemfields' new global campaign to promote Zambian emeralds
Actress Mila Kunis in Gemfields’ new global campaign to promote Zambian emeralds

Gemfields, which owns 75 percent of the Kagem emerald mine in partnership with the Zambian government, has unveiled its second advertising campaign, Beauty by nature, featuring global ambassador Mila Kunis and designed to promote Zambian emeralds worldwide.

Captured by legendary portrait photographer Peter Lindbergh, styled by Lori Goldstein and with creative direction by Jonny Lu, the 2014 campaign is a celebration of natural beauty — embodied in both Mila Kunis and Gemfields’ coloured gemstones. Iconic black and white images of the actress are layered with still-life images of the company’s emeralds, rubies and amethysts in their raw, natural form.

“Peter makes you feel very comfortable, and allows you to be spontaneous and not self-conscious,” says Kunis. “I didn’t have any make-up on; I didn’t have my hair blow-dried — so I felt a little bare. But he made me feel the most beautiful I have ever felt, and he was able to capture a very honest moment.”

Following the announcement of a partnership in early 2013, Kunis travelled to Gemfields’ emerald mine in Zambia to further her understanding of gemstone mining, and has become an advocate for the company’s ethical approach. Kunis has also appeared at several red carpet events dressed in jewellery featuring Gemfields’ gemstones, including this year’s Golden Globe Awards.

“As Gemfields’ Global Ambassador I have been able to deepen my knowledge and understanding of coloured gemstones, and in the process I have come to appreciate jewellery so much more,” says Kunis. “Not only do I better understand the work that goes into the creative process but I have fully grasped just how rare and precious every gemstone is — and the remarkable journey each gemstone makes.”

To highlight Gemfields’ position as the leading supplier of responsibly sourced coloured gemstones to the world’s finest jewellery houses, luxury brands and retailers, Kunis has not been photographed wearing jewellery, a departure from the previous year’s campaign. Gemfields continues to support and collaborate with its partners in the jewellery industry, supplying them with their fine-coloured gemstones, and throughout 2014 still-life images of their jewellery creations will be featured in joint campaign images.

“We are thrilled about the new campaign,” says Gemfields CEO, Ian Harebottle. “Not only are the images incredibly impactful and very different to what other companies are doing — but they are perfectly aligned with our views of Gemfields, Mila Kunis and discerning jewellery consumers; natural, honest and totally unique.”

The global advertising schedule will appear in publications including Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Vanity Fair and W and includes a digital campaign running on vogue.co.uk, telegraph.co.uk and net-a-porter.com, amongst others. The campaign launches an exciting year for the company including several promotional and retail partnerships, a new blog called ‘Gemfields Journal’ (home to both informative and inspirational content) and a drive to promote consumer and retailer education through a series of bespoke gemstone master classes.

About Gemfields

Gemfields plc is a leading gemstone miner listed on the AIM market of the London Stock Exchange (ticker: ‘GEM’). The company’s principal asset is the 75 percent owned Kagem emerald mine in Zambia, the world’s single largest emerald mine. In addition to the Kagem emerald mine, Gemfields has a 50 percent interest in the Kariba amethyst mine in Zambia. The company also owns controlling stakes in a highly prospective ruby deposit in Mozambique and licences in Madagascar including ruby, emerald and sapphires deposits.

In July 2009 Gemfields commenced a formal auction programme for its Zambian emeralds. To date, the Company has held 14 auctions which have generated revenues totalling US$224 million.

Gemfields is the world’s leading supplier of responsibly sourced coloured gemstones, positioned at the intersection of exploration, mining and marketing. The company has pioneered leading environmental, social and safety standards within the sector and by doing so is able to provide discerning customers with the assurance they require of the responsible journey their gemstones have taken from mine to market.

Gemfields also supports down-stream stakeholders in the marketing and selling of their cut and polished coloured gemstones via Gemfields’ portfolio of global sales offices. In 2013, Mila Kunis was announced as Gemfields’ Gobal Ambassador and the face of its advertising campaigns, featuring creative collaborations with leading international jewellery designers. www.gemfields.co.uk

Mila Kunis wearing Gemfields Zambian emerald stud earrings by Marina B to the 71st Golden Globes last night
Mila Kunis wearing Gemfields Zambian emerald stud earrings by Marina B to the 71st Golden Globes last night

Hollywood actress Mila Kunis wore Gemfields Zambian emerald jewellery at the 71st Golden Globe Awards last night.

The star wore stud earrings and a bangle by Marina B to last night’s glittering Golden Globe Awards. To compliment her emerald jewellery, Kunis worn a bespoke Gucci Premiere gown.

The emeralds were mined at the world’s largest emerald mine, Kagem Mine in Lufwanyama District, which is owned by Gemfields in partnership with the Zambian government.

The actress, who previously won a Golden Globe for her role in Black Swan, presented an award with Jupiter Ascending co-star Channing Tatum, at this year’s ceremony, which took place at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles.  To compliment her emerald jewellery, Kunis worn a bespoke Gucci Premiere floor-length gown.

Since her 2013 appointment as Global Ambassador and face of Gemfields, the world’s leading supplier of responsibly sourced coloured gemstones, Kunis has become an advocate for the company’s approach.

Gemfields Zambian emerald, emerald-cut studs by Marina B in 18-k gold.

10.94 carats (total weight) Gemfields Zambian emeralds.

$240,000

 

Gemfields emerald bangle by Marina B in 18k gold and black metal

1.90ct Gemfields Zambian emerald

2.29ct diamonds

$56,400

About Gemfields

Gemfields plc is a leading gemstone miner listed on the AIM market of the London Stock Exchange (ticker: ‘GEM’). The company’s principal asset is the 75 percent owned Kagem emerald mine in Zambia, the world’s single largest emerald mine. In addition to the Kagem emerald mine, Gemfields has a 50 percent interest in the Kariba amethyst mine in Zambia. The company also owns controlling stakes in a highly prospective ruby deposit in Mozambique and licences in Madagascar including ruby, emerald and sapphires deposits.

In July 2009 Gemfields commenced a formal auction programme for its Zambian emeralds. To date, the Company has held 14 auctions which have generated revenues totalling US$224 million.