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10 THINGS YOU DID NOT KNOW ABOUT KENNETH KAUNDA.

By Austin Kaluba

  1. Kenneth Kaunda ‘s parents were TongaBy Austin Kaluba

  2. Kenneth Kaunda ‘s parents were Tongas from Malawi. Tongas are an ethnic group who live in northern Malawi. A related ethnic group also called the Tonga are found in Zambia and Zimbabwe, with some in Mozambique. His detractors wanted to politicise this issue forgetting that Malawi, Zimbabwe and Zimbabwe were jointly governed as a unit under the infamous Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland. His foreign parentage was to put him in a better stead when he took power since it helped him unite Zambian tribes under a unitary slogan of One Zambia, One Nation.

  3. During the struggle for independence, Kaunda chose a non violence approach to achieving freedom earning himself the nick name ‘Ghandi of Africa,’
  4. Late in 1948, Kaunda and other nationalists Simon Kapwepwe and John Sokoni briefly left Copperbelt to open the Chinsali African Welfare Association. Jobs were scarce for ‘dangerous’ and radical nationalists like Kaunda. To survive, he bought a sewing machine and sew second hand clothes bought from Mokambo on the Zambia/Congo DR border. He also grew food as a peasant farmer while organising political rallies. Later when he appeared in court, he joked about his peasant farmer days.
  5. In his favourite political song, Tiyende Pamodzi (Lets walk together) Kaunda symbolically sang of crossing the Limpopo and the Zambezi rivers to complete the African liberation. He did this by supporting all the neighbouring countries that were still under colonial rule when he ascended to power.
  6. A popular Lusaka business man of Asian origin Rambhai D. Patel, nicknamed as “Kanjombe” was closely involved in the liberation of Zambia from the colonial yoke. He organised scholarships for young nationalists like Kaunda, Simon Kapwepwe and Munukayumbwa Sipalo. It was during this formative years as a nationalist that a youthful Kaunda embraced Indian religions that was to remain with him for life,
  7. To elaborate his ideology, Kaunda published several books: Humanism in Zambia and a Guide to its Implementation, Parts 1, 2 and 3. Other publications on Zambian Humanism are: Fundamentals of Zambian Humanism, by Timothy Kandeke; Zambian Humanism, religion and social morality, by Cleve Dillion-Malone S.J. and Zambian Humanism: some major spiritual and economic challenges, by Justin B. Zulu. Kaunda on Violence, (US title, The Riddle of Violence), published in 1980 and Letters to my Children.
  8. On 26 August 1975, Kaunda acted as mediator along with the Prime Minister of South Africa, B. J. Vorster at Victoria Falls to discuss possibilities for an internal settlement in Southern Rhodesia with Ian Smith and the black nationalists.
  9. During his political career, Kaunda faced many hurdles among them the Lenshina Uprising, the Mushala Rebellion; attempted military coups, attacks from colonialists regionally, economic problems, food riots; and events leading to the Third Republic government under Frederick T.J. Chiluba. Other problems included being detained by Chiluba, being declared stateless and being shot at. It is not surprising that one of his favourite hymms is Rock of Ages which he sang when he was released from detention.
  10. On 19 October 2007 Kaunda was the recipient of the 2007 prestigious Ubuntu Award adding to countless awards and honourary degrees he has received.
  11. Kaunda is still politically active and sane for a man of his age.
    s from Malawi. Tongas are an ethnic group who live in northern Malawi. A related ethnic group also called the Tonga are found in Zambia and Zimbabwe, with some in Mozambique. His detractors wanted to politicise this issue forgetting that Malawi, Zimbabwe and Zimbabwe were jointly governed as a unit under the infamous Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland. His foreign parentage was to put him in a better stead when he took power since it helped him unite Zambian tribes under a unitary slogan of One Zambia, One Nation.
  12. During the struggle for independence, Kaunda chose a non violence approach to achieving freedom earning himself the nick name ‘Ghandi of Africa,’
  13. Late in 1948, Kaunda and other nationalists Simon Kapwepwe and John Sokoni briefly left Copperbelt to open the Chinsali African Welfare Association. Jobs were scarce for ‘dangerous’ and radical nationalists like Kaunda. To survive, he bought a sewing machine and sew second hand clothes bought from Mokambo on the Zambia/Congo DR border. He also grew food as a peasant farmer while organising political rallies. Later when he appeared in court, he joked about his peasant farmer days.
  14. In his favourite political song, Tiyende Pamodzi (Lets walk together) Kaunda symbolically sang of crossing the Limpopo and the Zambezi rivers to complete the African liberation. He did this by supporting all the neighbouring countries that were still under colonial rule when he ascended to power.
  15. A popular Lusaka business man of Asian origin Rambhai D. Patel, nicknamed as “Kanjombe” was closely involved in the liberation of Zambia from the colonial yoke. He organised scholarships for young nationalists like Kaunda, Simon Kapwepwe and Munukayumbwa Sipalo. It was during this formative years as a nationalist that a youthful Kaunda embraced Indian religions that was to remain with him for life,
  16. To elaborate his ideology, Kaunda published several books: Humanism in Zambia and a Guide to its Implementation, Parts 1, 2 and 3. Other publications on Zambian Humanism are: Fundamentals of Zambian Humanism, by Timothy Kandeke; Zambian Humanism, religion and social morality, by Cleve Dillion-Malone S.J. and Zambian Humanism: some major spiritual and economic challenges, by Justin B. Zulu. Kaunda on Violence, (US title, The Riddle of Violence), published in 1980 and Letters to my Children.
  17. On 26 August 1975, Kaunda acted as mediator along with the Prime Minister of South Africa, B. J. Vorster at Victoria Falls to discuss possibilities for an internal settlement in Southern Rhodesia with Ian Smith and the black nationalists.
  18. During his political career, Kaunda faced many hurdles among them the Lenshina Uprising, the Mushala Rebellion; attempted military coups, attacks from colonialists regionally, economic problems, food riots; and events leading to the Third Republic government under Frederick T.J. Chiluba. Other problems included being detained by Chiluba, being declared stateless and being shot at. It is not surprising that one of his favourite hymms is Rock of Ages which he sang when he was released from detention.
  19. On 19 October 2007 Kaunda was the recipient of the 2007 prestigious Ubuntu Award adding to countless awards and honourary degrees he has received.
  20. Kaunda is still politically active and sane for a man of his age.

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Comment:

6 responses to “10 THINGS YOU DID NOT KNOW ABOUT KENNETH KAUNDA.”

  1. […] principalement dans le nord et le sud. Il est intéressant de constater que l’ancien président Kaunda est né dans le nord de la Zambie, dans la province de Bemba, de parents Tonga venant du Malawi. Ce […]

  2. […] principalement dans le nord et le sud. Il est intéressant de constater que l’ancien président Kaunda est né dans le nord de la Zambie, dans la province de Bemba, de parents Tonga venant du Malawi. Ce statut […]

  3. […] mostly in the north and south, respectively. Interestingly, former President Kaunda was born in traditionally Bemba northern Zambia to Tonga parents from Malawi, and this […]

  4. Mukanwa says:

    kaunda is a brave man

  5. Nick Dimms says:

    So one has to fish out the 10 things from the Article. I can only see 1 that KK was Tonga! The rest is public knowledge.

  6. kaela says:

    Note: I see some duplication.

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