File: Zambia Police
POLICE officers who were deployed at Limulunga High School to quell riots in Mongu in January of 2011, are suspected of making 30 pupils pregnant at the learning institution, Parliament heard yesterday. This came to light during the Vice President’s question time when Luena member of Parliament Mulumemui Imenda (Alliance for Democracy and Development) asked whether Government is aware that about 30 pupils were impregnated by police officers who were camped at the school during last year’s January 14 Mongu riots.

Ms Imenda also wanted to know whether Government has received a report on the matter which was investigated by the Rodger Chongwe Commission of Inquiry into the Mongu riots. If the report is true, then 30 pregnant girls is more than half the number of pupils in a class which is normally 50.

In response, Vice President Guy Scott said the matter is in the report of the Commission of Inquiry, which has not yet been released to the public. Dr. Scott said he expected the report of the commission of Inquiry on the Mongu riots to be in the public domain soon.

Hundreds of Police officers were deployed to Mongu last year, to maintain law and order during the riots.
The Vice President said Government is actively studying the report and will make its position known on the matter when all the recommendations have been studied.

He said members of the public should not panic, as the authorities are actively studying all the recommendations, before making their position known on the matter. Dr Scott said this in response to a follow up question from Itezhi-Tezhi member of Parliament Greyford Moonde (UPND) who wanted to know why Government is taking long to publicise the report of the Commission of Inquiry into the Mongu riots.

Mr. Moonde said it is important that the report is released to the public, so that Zambians are made aware of the findings and the suggested recommendations. He said people are concerned about the Government’s delay in releasing the report, following its submission to the President.

Mr. Moonde said making the report public will promote transparency in dealing with the matter, which has threatened Zambia’s sovereignty and unitary status. Meanwhile, Parliament learnt that 912 people were arrested between August 30, 2011 and December 30, 2011 for trafficking in cannabis.

Deputy Minister of Home Affairs Ngosa Simbyakula said 805 cases of drug trafficking were also handled by the Drug Enforcement Commission during the same period. Dr. Simbyakula said this in response to a question from Chilubi MP Obius Chisala (PF) who wanted to know how many cases of drug trafficking were handled by the DEC during the period under review, as well as how many people were arrested for trafficking in cannabis.

And Speaker of the National Assembly Patrick Matibini has urged MPs to ask their questions clearly during the Vice President’s question time. Dr. Matibini said it is important for MPs to start asking definite questions so that the Vice President can respond effectively.

He said this when he made a ruling after a point of order raised by Chembe MP Mwansa Mbulakulima (MMD) who wanted to know whether the Vice President was in order not to give definite answers to questions raised by MPs.
Mr Mbulakulima accused the Vice President of lowering the standards of the House.

This was when Dr Scott responded to a question by saying he could not give detailed answers to a question raised because he did not have full details./Daily Mail

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